Even with all of the interest in the Fiduciary Rule, the DOL is still paying attention to lifetime income-so much so that the Qualified Longevity Annuity Contract (the “QLAC”, established by the IRS) was granted broad relief under the Rule. This relief is so favorable that one of the claims being brought in the 5

The DOL just published its first serious guidance on supporting lifetime income with the publication of FAB 2015-2, guidance which is very necessary for the success of the Qualified Longevity Annuity Contracts, as well as DC lifetime income income. The FAB is an initial, but substantial, step in addressing one of the most pressing of the ERISA issues related to providing lifetime income from defined contribution plans.
Continue Reading DOL Provides Key ERISA Guidance on QLAC/DC Lifetime Income

The QLAC seems to be in the 403(b) “sweet spot”, considering that 403(b) annuities were originally designed to provide lifetime income in the first place. However, as with all things 403(b), however, there are a few unusual twists when trying to put a QLAC in a 403(b) arrangement. Here are a few of the things to consider
Continue Reading The 403(b) QLAC

With regard to the DOL’s fiduciary proposed regulations, There is much to like in the new rules; some troubling things; and, perhaps, a mistake or two which will be all flushed out in the coming months. There are a couple of technical points which are worthwhile sharing because they represent what we can expect of the “unexpected” as we work through the changes’ impact. These include the impact on lifetime income , and the application of the PT rules on the purchase of annuities-including QLACs.
Continue Reading DOL’s Proposed Fiduciary Rules May Unexpectedly Open Lifetime Income Door, If…….

In Lifetime Income, ERISA’s statute of limitations may serve to provide the basis for a workable standard when dealing with the long term financial risk posed to fiduciary by insurer insolvency following the purchase of an annuity.
Continue Reading Lifetime Income: Using the Statute Of Limitations to Minimize Insurer Insolvency Risk

Chuck Thulin, a fine ERISA attorney from Seattle, WA, chaired the DOL practitioner panel at the latest (and very successful) annual meeting of the 5 regional TE/GE Councils, in Baltimore.  When I commented that we’d  “been there, done that” when discussing some obscure rule,  he told me of reading of the Russian language version of

SquareCircleOne of the biggest challenges facing the task of wider implementation of retirement security through use of DC lifetime income has been the question of relevance. Quite frankly, plan sponsors and their advisors really have not seen the whole idea of lifetime income as relevant to their own plans and practices. It really hasn’t been

 Guaranteed lifetime income from a DC plan requires a contract with a life insurance company. Period. Even if the program is provided by a mutual fund company, a bank, or any other non-governmental entity, insurance companies are the only businesses which can issue to DC plans a contract guaranteeing lifetime income.

Choosing the right insurer

Lifetime Income for 401(k) plans has been been getting a lot of press, driven in large part by efforts by the DOL and Treasury to find ways to promote retirement security.

The IRS took a substantial step in making these DC lifetime income efforts become a reality with its publication of the final regulations establishing the “Qualified Plan Longevity Annuity Contract,” or “QLAC “. In order to even publish this regulation, however, the IRS had to “clear the underbrush” and resolve an number of technical issues relating to the manner in which defined contribution plans could even provide lifetime income.

Treasury and IRS staff did just this, and quite practically. The final regs even addressed some key market concerns, removing a couple of roadblocks which would have made the QLACs difficult to provide. So, for example, the QLAC can have a return of premium feature; can pay certain gains (which is important for certain, popular, annuity products); removed potentially duplicative disclosure requirements; and permits insurance companies to use off the shelf annuity products without amending them (if the contract otherwise meets the QLAC annuity requirements) until 2016. Staff also kept the QLAC simple (for example, no variable annuity contracts will qualify), thus keeping it very affordable.

Even though the establishment of the QLAC provides a good planning tool, for sure, and it does provide a modest tax benefit, that is not the real story here. The true impact of the QLAC reg, and what makes it so very important, is that it establishes the foundation under tax law by which DC plans can simply annuitize.

So, before you dive into the close details of the QLAC (and we will do that, as will many others, I’m sure, over the coming months), lets first turn to the tax rules that actually make lifetime income work in a defined contribution plan. You will need to understand what it takes to put an annuity into a plan, as well as what it takes to distribute an annuity from the plan.  I invite you to read the preamble to the originally proposed QLAC reg, as well as Rev Rul 2012-03. Between these two pieces of guidance, you find some very basic instructions on how DC annuitzation-even beyond QLACs- will work. Here’s a brief list of key elements:
Continue Reading New QLACs Establish Foundation for DC Annuitization

We have been extensively researching, writing on and developing the concept of providing lifetime income from defined contribution plans for some 15 years. The work has resulted in a patent; several major independantly published research papers; the  outlining of some of the important concepts which underline the proposed QLAC regs and its key revenue ruling; and the development of more than one retirement product. If you look closely, you’ll see that that many of the major whitepapers  published on lifetime income are well based on this extensive work we have published. Some of the work really is groundbreaking; for example, we propose  a useful fiduciary process which can be used by fiduciaries in the purchase of annuities, in our NYU paper.

This blog has carried much of that material for the past 5 years, since February, 2009. We’ve now compiled those pieces here for use by  employers, vendors, actuaries, advisers and attorneys who may be struggling to support lifetime income in defined contribution plans.


Continue Reading A Useful Compendium of Lifetime Income Guidance for Defined Contribution Plans